What is mindfulness? Is it Christian?

America is drowning in a flood of intellectual noise. Twitter feeds, Facebook posts, news reports, emails and text messages are just a few of the many popular means of barraging people with an excess of information. Many Americans are recognizing the need to shut down the noise and create moments of quiet in their lives. Mindfulness promises to help quiet the over stimulated minds of stressed out people. What is mindfulness? Is it something that Christians should be involved in?

Mindfulness promotes the focus upon the sensations of the moment to help to center the person in the present. Mindfulness does not teach focus on the task at hand. Mindfulness stops all other activity to become aware of the present. Mindfulness pauses and looks inward to pay complete attention to one’s senses, thoughts and emotions. It is the practice of being aware of the moment without critique, judgment or thought. A recent advertisement for local mindfulness classes said, “”Mindfulness is about paying attention on purpose in the present moment non-judgmentally.”

Mindfulness is taught through the application of principles from classic eastern meditation. By setting aside a specific time of meditation the person learns the ability to fully experience the sensations of the moment. Throughout the day the mindful person stops for a brief time to refresh mind, emotion and energy.

Americans have intentionally divorced mindfulness from its religious connections, but the principles behind this practice are nothing less than pagan. Mindfulness comes out of Buddhism and Hinduism. As a result, it is based upon a a view of the mind and body that is contrary to the Bible. Mindfulness, and all eastern meditation, starts with the premise that every person is a manifestation of the Divine. Mindfulness involves the participant in a technique springing directly from a false salvation that believes the ultimate goal is to be absorbed into the great universal divine.

As with most relaxation techniques mindfulness does bring some physical benefit to the practitioner. It may rest the mind, relax the body and refresh the person, but it carries with it the baggage of the false religions of the far east.

The quieting of the mind and attending to the moment are praiseworthy goals. Certainly a person should pay attention to the task and people at hand. This is not mindfulness. This is diligence and courtesy.

Instead of turning to mystical practices Christians should turn to the Bible for guidance in virtuous behavior. Give your life to the control of the Holy Spirit who will produce in you the fruit of love, joy and peace. Practice Biblical meditation on verses like Ecclesiastes 9:10; Ephesians 5:16-17; Colossians 4:5-6; Colossians 3:23 and 1 Thessalonians 5:17. These verses will help instill Christian virtues in your life. Practice some simple steps like turning off most of the notifications on your phone. Refuse to look at the phone every time it beeps. Turn off the TV. Ignore text messages when you are in a face to face conversation with someone. Pray. Remember that your life is given to you by God for His glory. Use your life intentionally and wisely for His service.

What is meditation?

The Bible exhorts men to meditate. So does Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Shintoism, Kabbalah, the new age religions, yoga, business leadership seminars and life improvement coaches. Meditation is popularly presented as a means of getting in touch with self, controlling emotions, conquering disease, becoming one with the divine or reaching one’s true potential.

Did the Psalmist practice meditation similar to that of Buddha? Did Paul have something like transcendental meditation in mind when he commanded, “Meditate on these things”? Does the Bible present meditation as means of calming the soul?

Meditation comes in many different varieties, some very different from others. Some groups teach meditation as an emptying of all thought and losing oneself in the peacefulness of harmony with the universe. Others teach meditation as a careful attention to one’s breathings and sensations that gives full attention to what is happening at that moment.

Much of the meditation practiced in America today is influenced by Buddhist and Hindu teachings but is stripped of its associated teachings. Despite the lack of overt eastern religious training getting in touch with oneself, paying careful attention to the moment, not reacting to external stimuli and feeling a connectedness to others are all ideas pulled straight out of the Eastern religions.

Meditation in all the eastern religions is a means of achieving the highest spiritual state, usually associated with ending the supposed cycle of reincarnation. For example, the Buddhist is at peace with the world because he is not deeply affected by anything that goes on. He has distanced himself from his passions and longings. Only by disconnecting himself from everything can the Buddhist reach Nirvana. Meditation is the means by which the Buddhist trains himself to remain aloof from deep desire and deep attachment.

Meditation in the Bible is very different from the meditation practiced by mystical, new age and eastern religions. The Biblical practice of meditation is centered on the truth of God. When David says in Psalm 119, “Oh how I love thy law, it is my meditation all the day” he is describing a careful attention to the Word of God. When Paul says, “Meditate on these things” he is instructing Timothy to think deeply about the truths Paul has taught him. Meditation always refers to careful attention to information. Biblical meditation focuses on what God has revealed in His Word so the Christian may better understand and obey it.

Biblical meditation is not a way to disconnect, focus, heal or reach the Divine. Biblical meditation is one part of the study of the Bible. The one meditating remembers truth, considers truth, seeks the best understanding of truth, and works through how truth applies to his life. Biblical meditation does not require a particular pose or measured breathing. Biblical meditation does not require an emptied mind released of conscious thought. It requires an attentive mind directed to and by Scripture. Biblical meditation focuses on God and His Word so the Christian may better live in a way that is pleasing to Him.