Is Social Justice Biblical?

Social justice is defined as “the redistribution of resources and advantages to the disadvantaged to achieve social and economic equality.” The aim of social justice is to tear down all distinctions between social classes and income disparities so that all are financially and positionally equal. Another has defined social justice as “the ability of people to reach their full potential within the societies in which they reside.” Notice, that definition says “ability” not “opportunity.” Some versions of social justice seek to redistribute resources, but not equally. Those in the lower classes would be given more to help them reach the level of the upper classes. The redistribution of resources by taking more from the wealthy and giving more to the poor is a key component of social justice.

God is deeply concerned with justice. God is described “a just God” (Isaiah 45:21) who requires His people to “do justice.” (Psalm 82:2-3; Proverbs 21:3; Isaiah 56:1; Micah 6:8). However, Biblical justice is far different from social justice. In short, the Bible is not concerned with equal outcomes, or even equal opportunities. Income inequities are a non-issue in Scripture. Biblical justice is concerned with protecting individuals, especially the weak, from abuse (Leviticus 19:11-14), fairness in business (Proverbs 20:10, 23) and punishment of evil doers (Proverbs 18:15; Leviticus 5:17).

The Bible holds every person responsible for their own decisions. Social justice treats people as a group. It assigns group guilt and looks for group solutions. Personal liberation is achieved through group liberation. The Bible teaches that each person will stand before God and be judged according to his own works. (Revelation 20:12) Condemnation and salvation is individual. “The son shall not bear the iniquity of the father, neither shall the father bear the iniquity of the son: the righteousness of the righteous shall be upon him, and the wickedness of the wicked shall be upon him.” (Ezekiel 18:20) The salvation God offers is not the salvation of a system or a group. Salvation is personal. Romans 9 denies that any person is condemned for being a member of a particular group or is saved by being part of a particular group. Instead, God puts no difference between any people group. “Whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.” (Romans 10:13)

The Bible does not teach forced equality of outcomes. Instead, Scripture teaches charity and generosity, but not financial or positional equality. In Israel God provided compassionate means to care for the poor. He gave the Jews certain laws that required charitable actions. The Israelites were commanded to leave the corners of their fields unharvested so the poor could come in and harvest food for themselves. This practice should be significant in the discussion about social justice. The landowners were not required to evenly distribute their profits to the poor. The government did not confiscate the land’s produce to distribute it equally to all citizens. The poor did not receive a gift of grain. A small portion of the fields were left for the poor to labor in so they could earn their food through their own efforts. Those who did not labor were not given food. God commands His people to be compassionate (Deuteronomy 15:7) and He shows special care for the poor (Proverbs 14:31), but the Bible does not teach that inequalities in condition or income are wrong.

Biblical justice does not insist upon equal outcome but upon equal treatment of all under the law. Israel was to have the same laws for foreigners as for those born in Israel. In other words, immigrants and citizens were under the same law. This same law put equal responsibility on the immigrant and the citizen. Immigrants were not exempted from obedience to the requirements of Israel because of their immigrant status. (Numbers 15:30) They also were not denied justice because of their status. (Exodus 12:49) Immigrants were protected from harassment and oppression. (Exodus 22:21) Everyone in Israel was to be treated the same in punishment and protection, regardless of their national origin.

Social justice believes the social status of the individual should be taken into account and benefits given to members of the lower classes. The laws of Israel make a specific point of teaching that wealth and status must never be a factor in dispensing justice. Judges can not take bribes. They must not rule in favor of the rich because of their influence. Judges must not show favoritism toward the poor. The difficulties of a person’s situation never justify their breaking the law or gain them advantage in the eyes of the law. The poor ought not be awarded a judgment because they are poor. To give preference to one because of their financial condition is injustice. (Leviticus 19:15)

The laws of Israel are an excellent case study on God’s views regarding justice in a society. Since all the laws given to Israel were given by God for the governance of His chosen nation, then the reasonable conclusion is that Israel’s law is God’s definition of social justice. God’s justice does not match modern conceptions of justice. This does not mean God is unjust. God is perfectly just. His instructions on justice ought to be considered justice, not the definitions of critical theorists. We need to correct our definitions of justice to bring them in line with God’s justice. “Shall mortal man be more just than God?” (Job 4:17)

The Bible is generally unconcerned with income and class distinctions because the wages of sin is death. The reality is that every person has a brief life on this earth. What matters most is not that poverty be eliminated. What matters most is that God has provided everyone the same opportunity for forgiveness of sin and eternal life. The greater need is salvation. That has been provided. Jesus gave up the vast riches of His glory to become a man and suffer the penalty of sin for humanity. His gift of forgiveness is available freely to all who believe Him. “He hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.” The redistribution of sin and righteousness is the redistribution we should be most concerned about.

For more on social justice tune in to 92.7 FM on Sunday, September 26 at 9:30 AM to hear Everlasting Truths Radio.

Does God Hate Homosexual?

Probably everyone has seen images of people carrying signs declaring, “God hates homosexuals.” Is this true? Does God hate homosexuals? The sin of homosexuality is despicable to God. (Leviticus 18:22) Those who live in homosexuality without repentance will not enter heaven. (1 Corinthians 6:9) The spread of homosexuality is the judgment of God upon a nation. Homosexuals are under the wrath of God and their homosexuality is the wrath of God upon them. (Romans 1:25-27) The Bible clearly condemns homosexuality, in the Old and New Testament. However, the Bible never says that God hates homosexuals. The Bible says God hates sin and He hates sinners.

The Bible says God hates sin. Several sins are listed as especially despicable to God, such as: pride, deceit, murder, fraudulent business practices, injustice and homosexuality. These lists of abominations do not single out homosexuality as unique among sins, nor do they minimize homosexuality’s sinfulness.

Yet, the Bible says that not only does God hate sin, He hates individuals. Hosea 9:15, “I hated them: for the wickedness of their doings.” Leviticus 26:30 warns the Israelites that if they did not obey God’s commands then God will say to them, “My soul shall abhor you.” Psalm 5:5 says simply, “(God) hates all workers of iniquity.” So, yes, God hates homosexuals. He hates homosexuals in the same way He hates all those who rebelliously and willfully persist in sin.

If you are still reading at this point you are probably demanding to know how the God who is Love can be said to hate anyone. God’s hatred of sinners is not a petulant or arbitrary hatred. God’s hatred does not in any way restrict the expression of His love. While a complete and satisfying reconciliation of God’s hatred and God’s love is not possible, the Bible clearly declares both. God is love and He hates sin and sinners. We must recognize that God’s love is not contradicted by His hate. The the hatred of God expressed in the Bible must not be confused with the unrighteous animosity common in human hatred. God can love the sinner perfectly while also hating them for their sin. In the end, the love of God for all men is unquestionable and undeniable. John 3:16 declares, “For God so loved the world He gave His only begotten Son that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” God’s love for the world is so great that while we were still in our sin He gave His Son to die for our sin. (Romans 5:8) “Herein is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us, and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins.” (1 John 4:10) God’s love extends to all humanity, regardless of their sin.

The reality is that all people are separated from God. No one is righteous. No one seeks after God. (Romans 3:10-11) Every person is naturally alienated from God and an enemy against Him. (Colossians 1:21) Every person is by birth the child of wrath and the child of disobedience. (Ephesians 2:2-2) Despite our sin God in His love gives the offer of salvation freely to all. God in His love gives salvation freely to all who trust Jesus for forgiveness. God does not exclude homosexual from His grace anymore than he excludes those who were once murderers, blasphemers or persecutors of Christ. (1 Timothy 1:12-14)

Homosexuals are under God’s wrath. They are dead in trespasses and sins just like everyone else. As a result, homosexuals are sinners in need of the mercy and grace of God. Because they are sinners they can be saved. They are not outside the reach of God’s love. Homosexuals are no less able to be saved than any other sinners because God loves them.

Is it a sin to not get vaccinated?

An official in the Russian Orthodox church recently said that those who refuse to get vaccinated against the coronavirus “are committing a sin they will have to repent for the rest of their lives.” According to this official, “The sin is thinking about yourself instead of thinking about other people.” Is it a sin to not be vaccinated against this current pandemic illness or against any other severe, widespread illness?

This question is not about vaccines, but about sin. To rightly understand what is sin it is essential to know who has the authority to declare something a sin. Things are not sinful because a church official declares them to be. No one- not a pastor, bishop, church, prelate or pope- have the authority to declare items as sin. Something is not sinful because a culture or society treats them as if they are sinful. Sin is only defined by the Word of God. Sin is violation of the commands of God. “Sin is the transgression of the law.” If the Bible says something is a sin, it is a sin. If the Bible does not give a direct declaration that something is a sin then great care needs to be exercised before condemn that thing as sin.

The Bible explicitly declares some things are sin. For example, “Thou shalt not bear false witness” and “Thou shalt not steal.” The Bible gives many principles which are then applied to circumstances. “Love you neighbor as yourself” is a command but the application of it varies from situation to situation. In one case it is loving to take a neighbor a loaf of fresh baked bread. In another case it is not loving to take a gluten-intolerant neighbor a loaf of fresh baked bread. The Bible does not contain any direct command about vaccination, illness or pandemics. Therefore, the Christian must examine the principles of the Bible to see which ones apply to this situation and then carefully work through how those principles apply in his life.

In some cases it is a sin to refuse a vaccine because of specific Biblical commands. The Bible commands Christians to obey their governmental authorities. A person who can be vaccinated and lives in a country where their government requires them to be vaccinated but refuses to do so that person is sinning by breaking the command of Romans 13:1. In some cases it is a sin to be vaccinated. If a Christian cannot be vaccinated with a clear conscience then it will be a sin for them to be vaccinated because of the principles found in Romans 14:23.

The most common Christian argument for getting vaccinated is the argument from love. The Bible is clear. Christians must love one another. No right thinking Christian can deny this command. The argument then is that getting vaccinated is loving to your neighbors, therefore, every Christian must be vaccinated. To not get vaccinated is selfish.

The problem with this is that it assumes the answer. It begs the question of the lovingness of being vaccinated. In applying the command to love your neighbor, the thing that must be proved is how getting vaccinated is actually and always showing Christian love and how not getting vaccinated is always selfish. A full discussion on the connection of love to vaccines is outside the scope of this article. This is a question too complex for the overly simple answers that seem to dominate the discussion. Christians need to be careful to give grace to those who reach different conclusions on this topic.

Christians must recognize that what something can only be declared a sin after careful and proper application of Biblical principles to a specific circumstance. Some things will always be sin no matter the situation. However, many principles can be applied in different ways in different times and situations. Christians need to be careful about absolutizing their application of Biblical principles. Sin is that which clearly violates the Word of God, not that which violates my application of the Word.

Does the Bible Condemn Homosexuality?

Yes it does. The Bible forbids homosexual sex without equivocation or exception.. In the book of Leviticus is possibly the clearest condemnation of homosexuality. “If a man lie with mankind as he lieth with a woman, both of them have committed an abomination.” (Leviticus 20:13)

Some protest that because this clear statement is found in the Old Testament it has no more application to today than the condemnation of shellfish. This kind of response can only come from one who has not seriously considered the teachinga of the Bible. Anyone who gives the Bible legitimate, unbiased study will recognize the Bible treats all forms of sexual immorality as always forbidden, while the dietary laws were temporary in effect. Further, the passage in Leviticus that forbids homosexuality also prohibits bestiality and incest. Few people today argue these are acceptable practices even though the Bible rarely mentions them outside the Old Testament law.

Those who still want to ignore the Old Testament commands find no refuge in the New Testament. Every time the epistles mention homosexual behavior they place it in a negative light. First Corinthians includes homosexuality in the list of works of unrighteousness which those who practice them cannot enter the kingdom of heaven. First Corinthians speaks of homosexuality euphemistically calling homosexuals “abusers of themselves with mankind.” Clearly, the New Testament does not consider homosexuality to be acceptable. The words of Romans 1 are even stronger. Homosexuality is the sign of God’s judgment on a people group. Those who reject God are given over to their own lusts. They work that which is not convenient and dishonor their own bodies. Women change the natural use into something against nature. Men burn with lust towards other men. Romans 1 calls homosexuality an unnatural act that disfigures and perverts the image of God in man. These two passages are more than sufficient to show that the New Testament clearly condemns homosexuality.

Some have argued that because Jesus did not condemn homosexuality then Christians today should not condemn homosexuality. First, consider the fact that the Jesus is God and the Bible is the Word of God. If the Bible condemns homosexuality then Jesus condemned homosexuality. Second, a strong case can be made that the New Testament commands against immorality are a summary of the Old Testament sexual prohibitions. When Jesus condemned fornication (Mark 7:21-23) He was doing more than condemning sex between two unmarried people. As a Jew Jesus understood the sexual laws recorded in the law of Moses. Fornication includes all the illicit sexual activity condemned in the law of Moses, which included homosexuality. Even further, if there was no condemnation of homosexuality recorded in the gospels the absence of a condemnation does not imply approval. Jesus did not condemn video piracy, but no one argues that He supports it. More seriously, Jesus never condemned slavery. Yet no one today seriously argues that Jesus was in favor of slavery.

Despite the efforts of those who teach otherwise the Bible clearly condemns homosexuality in all its forms. Despite the cultural demands that everyone support and celebrate homosexuality, the Biblical position is to condemn it. Homosexual sex is a perversion of God’s design for sex. It is a sign of the judgment of God on mankind. Homosexuality is a sin.

Is Galatians about Cultural Elitism?

Some modern Bible teachers have been teaching that certain passages of the New Testament are rebukes of racism or classism. The text in question is not the instruction of James 2, which is a direct rebuke of showing favoritism to the rich. Nor are they referring to the statements in Paul’s letters like Colossians 3:11, “Where there is neither Jew, nor Gree, circumcision, uncircumcision, barbarian, Scythian, bond, nor free: but Christ is all and in all.” These words are a clear statement that racial, national and social differences are eliminated in Christ. All believers are united together a one in Jesus. These truths are clear and are powerful opponents of racism and favoritism in the church.

However, some teachers have turned to other texts to decry elitism. Some have pointed to Galatians and Paul’s rebuke of Peter as a rebuke of promoting Jewish culture to the exclusion of Gentile culture. Paul is confronting Peter’s gospel error, not Peter’s cultural errors. Paul told Peter he was not acting according to the gospel. The climax of Paul’s argument comes when he says, “Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ.” Peter’s actions compromised the clarity of salvation by faith alone. Peter’s refusal to eat with Gentiles was not just a cultural thing, it was a gospel issue. Peter was forgetting that they Gentiles were saved by faith in Christ, just like the Jews. He was forgetting the Gentiles had received the Holy Spirit, just like the Jews. Paul rebuked Peter because his actions in refusing to eat with the Gentiles indicated that the Gentiles were not full members of Christianity, that Christ was not sufficient to save them, that they had to keep the law and become Jews to really be Christians. Paul’s rebuke of Peter is a gospel rebuke. It has cultural issues as the background, but Paul is not fighting for cultural differences to be set aside. Paul is fighting for the clarity of the gospel.

In a March 2021 Christianity Today article, Michael Rhodes taught that Paul’s rebuke of the Corinthian church was a rebuke of elitism and classism. He said, “The way they came to the Lord’s Supper reinforced socioeconomic divisions among them.” In 1 Corinthians 11 Paul confronted misuse of the meal associated with the Lord’s Supper. Apparently, the church in Corinth shared a meal together before taking the Lord’s supper. The Bible doesn’t tell us why they had the meal, only that some were going hungry because others were eating before them. Some had too much and others did not have enough. Rhodes said that the rich were being promoted and were establishing their elite status by going first in line, but Paul says nothing about social class in 1 Corinthians 11. Paul rebuked the Corinthians for their selfishness, not their elitism. He tells the believers to eat at home if they are hungry and to let others eat before them. He speaks of of their selfishness and callousness to the needy, not their promotion of the wealthy. Paul’s words have a direct application to how the church handles social and financial status, but Paul’s focus is teaching about class warfare. He is confronting the selfish, greedy, gluttony that will fill its belly at the expense of others.

The Bible clearly teaches that Christians must reject all forms of status oriented, external driven favoritism. Classism, elitism, racism and nationalism have no place in the church. Since the Bible condemns favoritism, what is the harm in teaching a Biblical truth from a wrong passage? The danger is in thinking we can use any passage of the Bible to prove a point. Every passage of the Bible has a meaning that was intended by the original authors. Any meaning drawn out of that passage today must be in accord with the original meaning. To misuse the Bible for a good purpose is still a misuse of Scripture. We have no need to misapply Galatians or Corinthians to make a good point today. God’s Word speaks clearly against racism, let’s pay attention to those passages.